GeoRabble Perth #21 | The Return

We’re back!

After a bit* of a hiatus, Perth GeoRabble is back in action and ready to ‘rabble! And just in time for the end of year festivities too 😉

Join us on the 28th of November as we have an exciting starting line up of speakers including:

  • Ross Lewin – Can Artificial Intelligence find the Ants? Work being done to trial hyperspectral imagery and Machine Learning/AI in the detection of Red Imported Fire Ants (RFIA) in Brisbane for the Queensland Government.
  • Ikrom Nishanbaev – Exploring Australian Cultural Heritage Sites with the Geospatial Semantic Web

With more to be announced very soon!

Logistical details:

  • 28th November 2018
  • Doors open 5:30pm
  • Presentations from 6:00pm
  • Universal Bar, 221 William St, Northbridge
  • A handful speakers, 10 minutes each, a room full of ‘rabblers, and the usual rules
  • Attendance is free, but for catering purposes please help our hosts by registering here

Follow @georabble on twitter or use the hashtag #georabbleper to join the conversation.

We can’t hold these events without the help of the greater Geocommunity! Please contact us if you’d like to be a part of sponsoring a future event or get involved in helping organise an event.

This event brought to you by the Perth GeoRabble team and sponsored our friends @ Hexagon Geospatial

Hexagon Geospatial

*might maybe be a tad of an understatement

Perth Christmas Cross-Community GeoSpatial Drinks

We would like to extend a warm & merry invite to join us for a very spatial end of year event in Perth, together with the geo-folks from Geogeeks & Geospatial Amateurs community groups.

No RSVP is required and the event is free to attend. Please feel free to forward, share or invite others who may be interested in coming along.

geoxcommunitydrinks2016

We look forward to seeing you there!

With merriment & love,

–the Perth GeoRabble crew

GeoRabble Perth #14 – Rise of the Machines

Speakers:

  • Matt Barrett – Machines and utilities
  • Fedja Hadzic – Inventor @ SkryData
  • Piers Higgs – Drones – the good, the bad, and the ugly – an all hazards perspective
  • Robert Lednor – Applications of drones (not just the cool stuff)
  • Mark Taylor – Certainty of uncertainty

Date: Wednesday, 9th September, 2015
Time: Doors open 5:30pm, Presentations from 6:00 pm
Location: Universal Bar, 221 William St, Northbridge 6003
Format: A handful speakers, 10 mins each, usual rules.
Registration: Attendance is free, but for catering purposes we need you to register!

Proudly sponsored by  Landgate – WALIS and NGIS Australia

Follow @georabble on twitter or use the hashtag #georabbleper to join the conversation.

We can’t hold these events without the help of the greater Geocommunity!

Please contact us if you’d like to be a part of sponsoring a future event.

 

Geo”Retro” Rabble – Perth 11

Taking a look at the past for this rabble! 

Speakers:
  • Lise Summers
  • Val McDuff
  • Nicholas Flett
  • plus more to be announced soon!

Date: 15th October, 2014
Time: Doors open 5:30pm, Presentations from 6:00 pm
Location: Universal Bar, William St, Northbridge

Format: A handful speakers, 10 mins each, usual rules.

Registration: Attendance is free, but for catering purposes we need you to register!

 

Follow @georabble on twitter or use the hashtag #georabbleper to join the conversation

We can’t hold these events without the help of the greater Geocommunity!

This event brought to you by the Perth GeoRabble team and sponsored by Hexagon Geospatial

Hexagon Geospatial

GeoRabble Perth #9 Review

Over the four long, hot months since the WALIS forum in November, Perth geo-geeks built up a Rabble-sized thirst, with only one way to quench it… cue GeoRabble Perth #9! Held at the Universal Bar in Northbridge, this iteration of Perth’s favourite geo-outing drew a big crowd, including some of the usual suspects and many new faces.

As usual, we had a great array of thought provoking speakers bringing their perspective on what makes our field of endeavour fascinating. It’s not easy to stand up in front of your peers and talk about yourself for 10 minutes, particularly given GeoRabble’s strict rules on sales pitches, ‘about us’ slides, etc… but these folks really delivered the goods.

Ably hosted by Chelsea Samuel, GR#9 was kicked off by Grahame Bowland, who dazzled us with some pretty serious SQL queries, but promised that his open source geodata analysis framework would save us from having to write them ourselves.

Emil Vulin was up next, and shared his perspective on the exciting area of mobile mapping, including some interesting observations on the arrival of low-cost tablets in the developing world.

Sophie Richards’ talk on her experiences in crisis mapping with the UN, and particularly the use of crowdsourced information, was a fascinating look into how mapping and spatial data can make a real impact in the lives of people.

For something completely different, Chris Toovey treated us with some eye candy, talking about his experiences in the business of making 3d animated scenes, as said scenes flashed by on the screen. Cool!

Finally, Dan Goldberg, visiting from the University of Texas, dropped in to tell a few jokes and talk up his students.

And with the presentation portion of the evening at its end, the GeoRabble settled in for beers & some spirited conversation.

Thanks to all our speakers for entertaining us and providing food for thought, and to everyone who came and made GeoRabble #9 a great night! We’ll look forward to seeing you at the next one, and if you have a geo-story to tell, we want to hear from you…  Also thanks to our sponsors Talis Consultants

Perth Georabble #8 Review

Around 170 people were a part of Perth’s biggest rabbling ever, with MC John Bryant leading the evening.  The event was held at Crown Burswood as a part of the WALIS Forum. Thanks to our sponsors SIBA (Spatial Industries Business Association) and WALIS Forum for having us there.

Brett Madsen was the first speaker, and it was a privilege to have a founding GeoRabble kick-starter from the East join us. His tale of where he has come from kept the audience captivated. Rules of GeoRabble may have almost been broken when services and business were hinted at –come on @DARKspatialLORD you should know better!

Darren and Brett

Darren gives Brett the slide clicker in return for a beer

Perth’s own GeoRabble committee member Darren Mottolini took over the microphone to let us in on distorting maps and how to get a message communicated through map distortions. Ending with zombie maps, what was not to enjoy in Darren’s talk?

A further founding GeoRabble kick-starter, Maurits van der Vlugt travelled a long way just to join Perth GeoRabblers for the evening (well, we would like to think it was just for us!). He delved into the fascinating topic of gerrymandering, and the influence that electoral boundaries have on election outcomes.

Lise Summers gave us a fascinating look into how maps are carefully taken out of archives, off the printed and hand drawn pages and captured into formats able to come alive on our computer screens. Lise’s description of her experiences with the digital capture process was an eye opener, to say the least. The amount of work and care taken to not destroy these precious pages in the capture process was remarkable.

Ever built a computer chair out of a car seat and a massage chair so that you can fully experience the bumps in the road in a game? Well, Erik Champion was involved in doing so. Making computer games come alive and really getting to experience the simulation world made for a fantastic talk.

Helen Ensikat has created Beaufort Street Maps capturing Beaufort Street in a stunning way. Various aspects of this street have been captured from Helen’s view point. From the coffee shop where she drank great coffee, to the stars, the food ratings of the restaurants, tagging on the walls, to the little black poodle which has a fluffy tail have been captured for all to see.

Please come along to the final gathering for 2013. This month we’ll be joining forces with the Perth GeoSpatial Network to celebrate the end of year with some casual drinks at Bob’s Bar (http://www.printhall.com.au/bobs-bar/ ). We look forward to seeing you there 🙂
When: Wednesday, 4th Dec, 5:30pm
Where: Bob’s Bar (Rooftop bar of the Print Hall)

If we don’t see you there, we hope you have a great festive season and we’ll see you in the new year – for GeoRabble #9!

GeoRabble Perth #8 – Dates, Speakers…. Tickets!

7th November 2013, doors open at 5:30pm

The next highly anticipated edition of GeoRabble hits Perth on the 7th of November 2013, coinciding with the WALIS Forum, Australia’s largest spatial conference! GeoRabble #8 will be the highlight networking event on the Thursday evening of WALIS Forum to be held at the Crown Convention Centre at Burswood.

Speakers:

  • Lise Summers
  • Erik Champion
  • Maurits van der Vlugt
  • Darren Mottolini
  • Brett Madsen
  • Helen Ensikat

If you’ve not attended a GeoRabble before, it’s a fantastic casual night, filled with short, pithy presentations from like-minded geo-types that are free from sales pitches.  We have released a whole lot more tickets to this event but don’t let that fool you with GeoRabble constantly being oversubscribed, get your ticket fast!

To secure your ticket to GeoRabble #8 visit: http://georabble-per8.eventbrite.com.au/

We’re pleased that SIBA (Spatial Industries Business Association) have come on board to sponsor the next Perth GeoRabble, and the WALIS Forum have agreed to host this rowdy mob. Our thanks to them, we promise they wont regret it. 🙂

Hope to see you there!

Perth GeoRabble

Follow @georabble on twitter or use the hashtag #georabbleper to join the conversation

GeoRabble Perth #7 – June 20, 2013

GeorabblePerth_630The next occurrence of Australia’s favourite casual geo-event, Georabble, will occur on 20 June at the Leederville Hotel in Leederville, Perth.

Speakers so far include:

  • Kate Raynes-Goldie
  • Hai Tran
  • Shane French
  • Erwin Vos
  • Liz Marjot

In addition to this line up, the night will feature a mystery speaker, who will remain shrouded in secrecy, wrapped in a riddle, and enclosed in an enigma until a grand revelation on the night. Or something like that.

If you’ve not attended a Georabble before, it’s a fantastic casual night, filled with short, pithy presentations from like-minded geo-types that are free from sales pitches.  With 85 tickets snapped up the remaining 65 FREE tickets have 6 days until the event to find owners.  Click Here to get your ticket!

We’re pleased that AAMGroup have come on board to sponsor the next Perth Georabble, and expect this event with its pizza, beer and awesome will be just as great as all the others.

AAM Logo

Announcing the date for GeoRabble Perth #7

June 20The Perth committee have been busy, and the next Rabble will be occurring on Thursday June 20, 2013.  If you’d like to be involved in organising, sponsoring or speaking at a future rabble, please contact them via the details on the Perth page.  Early tickets are now available at http://georabble-per7.eventbrite.com/

GeoRabble Perth #6 – Big Ideas for Big Data

Leaving yesteryear to the yesteryears, this byte of GeoRabble was synced with the worldwide event that was Big Data Week – a “global community and festival of data”. Yes, the puns were international(ly bad)!

Ian McCleod

Ian McCleod giving us a tour on his yellow submarine

The MC of the night, Nicholas Flett kicked off the sold-out event by introducing us to Ian McCleod, who led us on a colourful subsea tour of the how’s and what’s of data collection from wreckages, artefacts and other curiosities resting on the seabed; including what to do when you encounter a Japanese tank at 38m below surface when you’re only licensed to dive 30m (you go the extra 8m to capture that data!). Emphasised was the importance of keeping pace with ever evolving technology to capture data – and that despite the challenges it might present, data capture is always worth the effort.

Catapulting us from an underwater world to the twittersphere, Nicholas introduced the next speaker, Tim Highfield, who gave us an insight into the how the thoughts and voices of people around world become Big Data through Twitter. Using a combination of open-source and in-house tools and methods, Tim described how Twitter data is captured and some of the analyses that can be done by examining hashtags. GeoRabblers were walked through fascinating examples, including on Australian politics (eg #auspol, #ausvotes), the Queensland Floods, Arab Spring, Eurovision, Tour De France and Occupy Oakland. It would seem that that the very nature of Big Data coming out of Twitter lends itself to a plethora of analytical dimensions, limited only by creativity of the researcher. Tim left the audience with a sobering question of how to determine whether we have too much data or not enough, and a poignant statement – that while media represents the first draft of history, Twitter is the first draft of the present. Tim’s slides and presentation are available online here.

Next up, blasting from the twittersphere to outer reaches of space and time, we were introduced to Kevin Vinsen who gave us a thrilling insight into the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. After a short and sweet introduction to space, light-years, the Big Bang and telescopes, GeoRabblers were presented with the enormity of the project data itself: enough raw data to fill 15million 64GB iPods every day! That’s almost 1 exabyte a day! The processing power required is estimated at 100 petaflops per second, about 50 times more powerful than the most powerful computer in 2010 (about equivalent to the processing power of 100 million PCs). If that’s not Big Data, I’m not sure what is! Based on development trends it is expected that a supercomputer with processing power required will exist by 2018. The aim of the radio telescope is to address fundamental questions about the Universe (how did stars and galaxies form after the Big Bang?  Is there life beyond Earth?). To help out with processing all this data, Kevin made mention of SkyNet (vaguely ominous name!), an initiative to pool together the processing power of personal computers connected to the internet to mimic the abilities of a supercomputer. What a wonderful opportunity for everyday citizens to contribute to a scientific endeavour of this calibre!

Onwards with the next speaker, Bryan Boruff, who delved into the semantic nature of this new buzz word that is ‘Big Data’, addressing the elephantine question of “What exactly is ‘Big Data’?”.  Bryan suggests that Big Data is data that is beyond the conventional or current methods of storing and handling. He went on to describe the dimensions in which Big Data increasingly presents itself – ‘four ‘V’s’: volume, variety, velocity and veracity. So how does one manage this situation? Bryan presented the paradigms of the familiar sequential ‘capture, store, analyse’ method of data handling and that of ‘automated epistemologies’, where data streams are analysed on the fly and not stored. But this presents a troublesome conundrum by contravening a basic scientific principle – that analyses/experiments must be able to be replicated, so therefore the data must be available. Tricky situation – will technology and people keep pace with data? Or will scientific method be challenged?

Wrapping up the presentations of the evening, Paul Farrell introduced GeoRabblers to “Big D”, the cool way to refer to Big Data, and kicked off with the interesting factoid that Big Data is apparently now the number one buzzword since ‘Y2K’, back when everyone thought the world would grind to a halt when the calendar ticked over to 2000. Paul went on to describe that the word ‘data’ is related to the Latin word for ‘fact’, and that it is not necessarily equivalent to information (DIKW Pyramid, anyone?), and that part of the phenomenon that is Big D, is the increasing ‘datafying’ of world – the metrication of more and more aspects of life into data, trying to address the ‘unknown knowns’. Adding to this is the increasing ability of science to not just acquire a sample of data, but the entire ‘population’ of it. Paul goes on to describe that increasingly, Big Data is more about distribution rather than analytical products – and that, in some respect, people’s own minds are the supercomputers. Returning to the seas, Paul left GeoRabblers of the night with an delightful anecdote of life of the sailor Matthew (Fontaine) Maury, “Pathfinder of the Seas” in the 1800s; under whose direction hundreds of ships’ logs were turned into data and locations charted (at least 1.2 million points!) to create Wind and Current Charts, which became an indispensable tool to mariners of all kinds. And that apparently, coincidently, the job title of those people going through the logs to capture the points was….. ‘Computer’.

GeoRabble Perth Crew

(most of) The GeoRabble Perth Crew

Many thanks to Darren Mottolini for his time and efforts in organising the event, especially coinciding it with the birth of his 2nd child – Congrats!, to the speakers of the night, to the talented MC Nicholas Flett and to the event sponsor Landgate.Landgatelogo

And in the words of Ian McLeod, “keep logging, keep mapping and good luck to you”.

GeoRabble http://www.georabble.org happens in various locations around Australia, is free and open to anyone, but frequently sells out.  If you would like to talk at a future Perth GeoRabble event, please send an email with the title and a short description to perth@georabble.org.

The next GeoRabble in Perth is June 20 and free tickets are available here